Mitchell D. Kreiter

Contact
Mitchell D. Kreiter
Phone: 312.222.0001
Cell: 312.806.6929
Email: mkreiter@mitchellkreiterlaw.com

Admissions
Illinois (1978); 7th Circuit Court of Appeals (1988); Northern District of Illinois (1978); Central District of Illinois (1988); Northern District of Indiana (1997); Eastern District of Wisconsin (1989); Western District of Wisconsin (1991); Southern District of Texas (1997); Eastern District of Michigan (1994).

Appearances
Mitchell has represented clients on a state and federal level in many other jurisdictions including: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin.

Education
The John Marshall Law School, J.D. 1978
University of Wisconsin, B.A. 1972

Government/Military Service
Illinois National Guard as a Military Policeman (1967-1971)

Member: Chicago Bar Association (Member of Judicial Evaluation Committee)

Professional Profile

Mitchell D. Kreiter was born and raised on the north side of Chicago. He graduated with a liberal arts degree from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1972. After graduation he attended the Greenberg Institute for Higher Jewish Studies in Jerusalem and he also attended graduate school in Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Not having found his calling, he attended The John Marshall Law School as a night student, maintaining full-time employment during the day. Upon graduation from law school in 1978 he hung up a shingle in the River North area of downtown Chicago, where he remained for thirty-six years.

Mr. Kreiter’s first case as a solo practitioner was a criminal case and he was enthralled with the concept of standing up for the rights of individuals. Thirty-six years later he is still impassioned with protecting the rights of individuals and holding the state and the federal government to their burden in all cases. He is considered to be one of the best cross-examiners in defense of criminal cases today.

Throughout the years Mr. Kreiter has mentored and tutored countless young lawyers who worked for him and others who would seek his assistance and counsel in applying a practical twist to the ideals that were learned in law school.

Mitchell Kreiter has represented individuals charged with the crimes including, but not limited to, murder, death penalty cases, kidnapping, home invasion, major drug conspiracies, armed robbery, and just about every other case in which a purported violation of the criminal law was involved. Prior to the State of Illinois’ abolishment of the death penalty, Mr. Kreiter was a member of the Capital Litigation Trial Bar. He has tried 60-70 jury trials, hundreds of bench trials, and he has litigated hundreds of motions, and actively pursued numerous appeals. Additionally, Mr. Kreiter has tried to a jury multiple civil cases.

Personal Ideals

Mr. Kreiter’s career has been primarily concerned with the search for truth and justice. he has appeared before hundreds of judges during the course of his career and has come to the conclusion that justice is fleeting and in the multitude of instances not realized in our criminal justice system. The 1975 Illinois Criminal Code was comprised of a grand total of 230 pages in contrast to the 2012 Illinois Criminal Code which contains approximately 1500 pages. these codes address the issue of all possible unlawful conduct pursuant to Illinois Law. The world’s population in approximately 6.5 billion in contrast to the 330 million people that currently reside in the United States or approximately 5% of the world’s population. There are 2.3 million inmates currently incarcerated in our prisons representing 25% of the world’s prison population. There are two possible explanations to this conundrum; either we are more evil that the other people in the world or our criminal justice system has lost all logic and common sense. We spend more money on our prisons than we do on our schools. At least one half of our inmates are incarcerated for committing non-violent crimes against society in general and not G-D made laws.